Skin Irritation


Numerous topical preparations containing cholestyramine or sucralfate (creams, adhesive pastes, enemas, suppositories) have been used for their protectant properties or for treatment of a variety of dermatologic and mucosal problems, including oral and esophageal ulcers, peristomal and perineal excoriation, decubitus ulcers, and radiation-induced rectal and vaginal ulcerations, and second and third degree burns.

Ann Pharmacother 1996 Sep;30(9):954-6
Cholestyramine ointment to treat buttocks rash and anal excoriation in an infant.
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Dis Colon Rectum 1987 Feb;30(2):106-7
Cholestyramine ointment in the treatment of perianal skin irritation following ileoanal anastomosis.
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Clin Exp Dermatol. 2000 Nov;25(8):584-8
Topical sucralfate in the management of peristomal skin disease: an open study.
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Burns. 2001 Aug;27(5):465-9
Topical use of sucralfate cream in second and third degree burns.
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